Hocus pocus, wedding rings, and mashed potatoes


By Hannah Kaufman - For The Tribune and Yadkin Ripple



Pumpkin patches make for a family tradition.


Photo courtesy of Pexel

BOONVILLE — What are Halloween traditions to you? Is it dressing up and getting candy? Is it going out to a Halloween bash? Do you visit a pumpkin patch in search of the perfect orange specimen? Those traditions are up to you to decide for this festive holiday.

Halloween originated in the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain to scare off ghosts and light bonfires. The evening before was known as Hallow’s Eve, and later it was known for just Halloween. So this holiday has been celebrated for almost 2,000 years.

Halloween, for some people, is staying home and giving out candy or watching scary movies all night. For some, it’s dressing up and going trick or treating or going to a party. Little kids love this time of year because of all the candy.

“I usually stay home and watch ‘Hocus Pocus’ or scary movies. I don’t usually go trick or treating, but last year I did with my best friend, and I had a blast,” said Jessica Livengood, a senior at Starmount High School.

Have you ever heard of the Halloween matchmaking tradition? Apparently, women of the late 1800s would use this day to figure out who their husbands would be. They thought by the next Halloween that they would be married. This task involved a chief in Ireland who would place a ring on a woman’s mashed potatoes, and she hoped that a man would fall for her cooking and for her hand in marriage.

There are many traditions for Halloween, but most go hand in hand with candy nowadays. Halloween traditions carry on to this day, and many more will form as the years go on. So enjoy the spooky night and carry on this ghoulish tradition.

Hannah Kaufman is a senior member of the Yadkin Virtual Academy of Journalism.

Pumpkin patches make for a family tradition.
http://www.yadkinripple.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/web1_pumpkin-patch-formatted.jpegPumpkin patches make for a family tradition. Photo courtesy of Pexel

By Hannah Kaufman

For The Tribune and Yadkin Ripple

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