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Last updated: November 20. 2013 5:43PM - 968 Views
By - agonzalez@civitasmedia.com



A dead carcass was spotted in December of 2012 in a State Road location showing the carcass only a few feet away from water that runs into the watershed. Officials say that bacteria from the decomposing carcass can seep into the watershed and it poses a human health risk.
A dead carcass was spotted in December of 2012 in a State Road location showing the carcass only a few feet away from water that runs into the watershed. Officials say that bacteria from the decomposing carcass can seep into the watershed and it poses a human health risk.
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Deer hunters in the northwestern section of North Carolina are gearing up for the hunt. Gun season will begin next weekend.


According to the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, hunters may use a gun starting on Saturday and running through Jan. 1.


“It’s an either-sex gun season, too,” said a spokesperson for the commission. “Antlerless deer are only taken during the either-sex season. We also urge all hunters to administer proper disposal rules relating to deer carcasses.”


In 2012, the town of Elkin had to launch a public service announcement after learning of multiple incidents of deer carcasses being dumped along roadways, streams and rivers.


“Some deer carcasses appeared in streams or rivers. The decomposing carcass bacteria can seep into the watershed that feeds into Elkin’s drinking supply,” said Elkin Town Manager Lloyd Payne previously.


The town official said that most successful hunters demonstrate excellent responsibility after the kill, which often means a trip to a local deer processor who takes the deer and reduces it to packages of venison.


However, last year’s chronic problem of improper deer carcass dumping was significant enough to get the attention of North Carolina’s Wildlife Resources Commission Law Enforcement unit.


“We are placing cameras in known dump sites to apprehend violators,” said Wildlife Resources Officer Tyler Brown.


According to the law enforcement unit, they recommend disposing of the byproduct by digging a pit in which the deer carcass is placed. Composting is another option. Double-bagging the remains and taking it to a landfill is an option, or leaving it to nature as long as it’s out-of-sight and nowhere near water.


Any person hunting deer during a deer firearms season is required to wear orange visible from all sides, said officials. An exception applies for landholders, their spouses, and children who do not have to wear orange on their land.


The enforcement unit indicated that deer hunting is prohibited in the eastern region with the use of dogs.


No person after sunset and until morning shall intentionally shine a light onto the deer, or sweep a light in search of deer.


Black bear hunting for Surry and Wilkes temporarily expires on Saturday, but then resumes from Dec. 16 through Jan 1. Yadkin County bear hunting expired on Nov. 16, but resumes Dec. 16 through Dec. 28.


Rules governing bear prohibit any hunter from placing processed foods as bait to attract a bear kill. The food list includes ingredients such as sugar, honey, syrups, oils and others.


Bear hunters are limited to one bear kill per season.


Reach Anthony Gonzalez at 835-1513 or agonzalez@civitasmedia.com.


 
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