Southeastern Primitive Rendezvous to educate visitors about ways of the past

By Wendy Byerly Wood - wbyerly-wood@elkintribune.com
Fish and Ellen Trout enjoy some afternoon quiet while He-who-sees-far had a chat with Happy-eyes during the 2016 Southeastern Primitive Rendezvous. - Beanie Taylor | The Tribune
Terry Bowen’s husband Scott had a prior interest in that historical period. Bowen clarified, “We don’t consider ourselves reenactors; we are interpreters.” - Beanie Taylor | The Tribune

History will be revisited in Yadkinville, from cooking on fires to dressing in period clothing, as members of the National Rendezvous and Living History Foundation host their 36th annual Southeastern Primitive Rendezvous.

While part of the experience is open to only members, the organization does welcome the public to attend their event and learn about early American history on three of the eight days they will be in the area.

On Oct. 21, 22 and 25 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., the public is invited to visit the rendezvous location, 297 Reavis Road, Yadkinville, and experience a time gone by including fur trappers, long hunters, American Indians and frontier families as they lived in the 17th and early 18th centuries. Sutlers will be selling supplies as well, with that area only open every day from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

NRLHF hosts several rendezvous events in different areas of the country each year. Bleu Reavis, who, with his sister, Chasity Robertson, owns the land used, said last year their property was an ideal location for the event. “With creeks on both sides and surrounded by woods, it’s like we’re really back (in time). When the sun goes down, you can’t see light from town … just the soft glow of lanterns,” Reavis said.

Each evening a camp meeting is held and the week includes activities from Highland Games, tomahawk and knife throwing, archery, basket weaving, cooking and much more, all which is done using tools and methods accurate to the period.

Last year, 259 members participated in the Southeastern Rendezvous with some coming from more than 900 miles away. Multiple states were represented.

Being more than a reenactment event, the NRLHF website explains the group’s goal is “to promote and educate about early American history.”

In addition to the three days for the public, school day at the rendezvous is Oct. 24 with school groups admitted free. Admission on Oct. 21, 22 and 25 is a $5 donation for those 13 and older, and free for 12 and younger. The sutler/trade area is open for public sales daily. They request no pets attend.

Booshway for this year’s gathering is Mickey Mikulis. For more information, email twotrips_mickey@hotmail.com, call 717-312-3016, 941-745-4103, or visit www.southeasternprimitiverendezvous.com.

Wendy Byerly Wood may be reached at 336-258-4035 or on Twitter @wendywoodeditor.

Fish and Ellen Trout enjoy some afternoon quiet while He-who-sees-far had a chat with Happy-eyes during the 2016 Southeastern Primitive Rendezvous.
https://www.yadkinripple.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/web1_1NRLHF-6-001.jpgFish and Ellen Trout enjoy some afternoon quiet while He-who-sees-far had a chat with Happy-eyes during the 2016 Southeastern Primitive Rendezvous. Beanie Taylor | The Tribune

Terry Bowen’s husband Scott had a prior interest in that historical period. Bowen clarified, “We don’t consider ourselves reenactors; we are interpreters.”
https://www.yadkinripple.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/web1_4NRLHF-4-001.jpgTerry Bowen’s husband Scott had a prior interest in that historical period. Bowen clarified, “We don’t consider ourselves reenactors; we are interpreters.” Beanie Taylor | The Tribune

By Wendy Byerly Wood

wbyerly-wood@elkintribune.com